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Current Courses

Title Instructor(s) Subfield Quarter Day, Time, Location
PHIL 2 (section 1)
Introduction to Moral Philosophy (ETHICSOC 20)

What should I do with my life? What kind of person should I be? How should we treat others? What makes actions right or wrong? What is good and what is bad? What should we...

Hussain, N., Lee, R., Attwood, A., Zweber, A., Lenczewska, O. 2017-2018 Spring
Monday Wednesday
3:00pm - 4:20pm
200-002
PHIL 13 (section 1)
Humanities Core: Great Books, Big Ideas -- Europe, Modern (DLCL 13, FRENCH 13, HISTORY 239C, HUMCORE 13)

This three-quarter sequence asks big questions of major texts in the European and American tradition. What is a good life? How should society be organized? Who belongs?...

Edelstein, D., Thun-Hohenstein, C., Baker, K. 2017-2018 Spring
Monday Wednesday
1:30pm - 2:50pm
STLC105
PHIL 22K (section 1)
Philosophy of time: history and debates

The philosophy of time has been a topic of discussion since the pre-Socratics, and thinking about time has been deeply implicated in our endeavor to understand what the...

Kim, H. 2017-2018 Spring
Monday
3:30pm - 5:20pm
260-301
PHIL 22P (section 1)
Love, friendship, and social construction

Grad-led tutorial. This course will explore the social dimensions of loving relationships, such as those between romantic partners, siblings, or close friends. In...

Parmer, W. 2017-2018 Spring
Wednesday
11:30am - 1:20pm
70-72A1
PHIL 22W (section 1)
Motivation, Obligation, and the Self

Grad-led tutorial. If you are Monica's friend and the appropriate circumstances arise, you presumably have a reason to help her move into her new apartment. If you are a...

Woodworth, S. 2017-2018 Spring
Wednesday
3:30pm - 5:20pm
70-72A1
PHIL 27S (section 1)
Human Nature

In this course we'll investigate what makes us human.

Woodworth, S. 2017-2018 Summer
Tuesday Thursday
3:00pm - 4:20pm
160-314
PHIL 28S (section 1)
Introduction to Modern Philosophy

This course is an introduction to modern philosophy which focuses on foundational texts from the early modern period by Descartes, Leibniz and Hume. These thinkers strive...

Ettel, J. 2017-2018 Summer
Tuesday Thursday
12:00pm - 1:20pm
380-381U
PHIL 29S (section 1)
Philosophy and Emerging Technologies

This course is an investigation into the philosophical questions raised by emerging technologies such as genetic engineering, self-driving cars, Mars colonization, and...

Costello, W. 2017-2018 Summer
Tuesday Thursday
1:30pm - 2:50pm
School of Education 313
PHIL 31S (section 1)
The Highest Good in Human Life

One of the first questions people ask, often jokingly, when you tell them that you are studying philosophy is: What is the meaning of life? In Ancient Greece, this...

Yang, K. 2017-2018 Summer
Monday Wednesday
1:30pm - 2:50pm
School of Education 210
PHIL 36 (section 1)
Dangerous Ideas (ARTHIST 36, COMPLIT 36A, EALC 36, ENGLISH 71, FRENCH 36, HISTORY 3D, MUSIC 36H, POLISCI 70, RELIGST 21X, SLAVIC 36)

Ideas matter. Concepts such as race, progress, and evil have inspired social movements, shaped political systems, and dramatically influenced the lives of individuals....

Anderson, R. 2017-2018 Spring
Wednesday
6:30pm - 8:20pm
Hewlett Teaching Center 201
PHIL 38S (section 1)
Introduction to the Philosophy of the Mind

Could people in the future upload their conscious minds to a computer and, so to speak, live forever? Do we have an obligation not to delete a conscious computer's...

Turman, J. 2017-2018 Summer
Tuesday Thursday
1:30pm - 2:50pm
160-314
PHIL 39S (section 1)
Introduction to Ethics

Construed broadly, ethics encompasses questions about moral truth, objectivity, and relativity; questions about what reasons we have to persist in acting morally; and...

Tulipana, P. 2017-2018 Summer
Monday Wednesday
3:00pm - 4:20pm
160-325
PHIL 40S (section 1)
Introduction to the Philosophy of Science

This course provides an introduction to some of the major philosophical questions about science. The first part of the course focuses on the role of values in a variety of...

Wang, Y. 2017-2018 Summer
Tuesday Thursday
10:30am - 11:50am
200-217
PHIL 42S (section 1)
Justice and Climate Change

Global climate change is among the greatest global political challenges of our time. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change said in 2014 that the warming of Earth's...

Francis, B. 2017-2018 Summer
Monday Wednesday
3:00pm - 4:20pm
200-107
PHIL 46S (section 1)
Modern Political Philosophy: Origins of the U.S. Constitution

In this course, we consider the political philosophy that culminated in the founding of the U.S. Constitution. We will consider, among other questions:n- What assumptions...

Espeland, A. 2017-2018 Summer
Tuesday Thursday
3:00pm - 4:20pm
90-92Q
PHIL 47S (section 1)
Introduction to Modern Philosophy: Skepticism and Scientific Rationalism

Focusing on Descartes, Newton, and Leibniz, the course investigates foundational debates in metaphysics and epistemology of modern philosophy. We closely scrutinize...

Parker, A. 2017-2018 Summer
Monday Wednesday
1:30pm - 2:50pm
School of Education 313
PHIL 49 (section 1)
Survey of Formal Methods

Survey of important formal methods used in philosophy. The course covers the basics of propositional and elementary predicate logic, probability and decision theory, game...

Briggs, R. 2017-2018 Spring
Tuesday Thursday
9:00am - 10:20am
300-303
PHIL 61 (section 1)
Philosophy and the Scientific Revolution (HPS 61)

Galileo's defense of the Copernican world-system that initiated the scientific revolution of the 17th century, led to conflict between science and religion, and influenced...

Friedman, M. 2017-2018 Spring
Tuesday Thursday
1:30pm - 2:50pm
200-303
PHIL 72 (section 1)
Contemporary Moral Problems (ETHICSOC 185M, POLISCI 134P)

Conflict is a natural part of human life. As human beings we represent a rich diversity of conflicting personalities, preferences, experiences, needs, and moral viewpoints...

Gillespie, L. 2017-2018 Spring
Wednesday Friday
10:30am - 11:50am
380-380F
PHIL 80 (section 1)
Mind, Matter, and Meaning

Intensive study of central topics in metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of language and mind in preparation for advanced courses in philosophy. Emphasis on development...

Kim, R., Taylor, G., Simon, A., Hobbs, L., Thompson, D., Taylor, K. Writing in the Major (WiM) 2017-2018 Spring
Tuesday Thursday
1:30pm - 2:50pm
260-113
PHIL 81 (section 1)
Philosophy and Literature (CLASSICS 42, COMPLIT 181, ENGLISH 81, FRENCH 181, GERMAN 181, ITALIAN 181, SLAVIC 181)

Required gateway course for Philosophical and Literary Thought; crosslisted in departments sponsoring the Philosophy and Literature track. Majors should register in their...

Dowling, G., Walton, K., Zurita, V., Landy, J. 2017-2018 Spring
Monday Wednesday
1:30pm - 3:20pm
50-52H
PHIL 90R (section 1)
Introduction to Feminist Philosophy (ETHICSOC 173)

If feminism is a political practice aimed at ending the patriarchy, what is the point of feminist philosophy? This course provides an introduction to feminist philosophy...

Carnegy-Arbuthnott, H. 2017-2018 Spring
Tuesday Thursday
10:30am - 11:50am
STLC105
PHIL 102 (section 1)
Modern Philosophy, Descartes to Kant

Major figures in early modern philosophy in epistemology, metaphysics, and philosophy of mind. Writings by Descartes, Leibniz, Hume, and Kant.

De Pierris, G., Parker, A., Ettel, J. 2017-2018 Spring
Tuesday Thursday
12:00pm - 1:20pm
200-030
PHIL 113A (section 1)
Porphyry's Introduction to Logic (PHIL 213A)

The main text will be the Isagoge.

Code, A. 2017-2018 Spring
Monday
3:00pm - 5:50pm
PHIL 120 (section 1)
Leibniz (PHIL 220)

A polymath, Leibniz invented the calculus independently of Newton and made major contributions to virtually every science, including logic and computer science. In this...

Parker, A. 2017-2018 Spring
Monday Wednesday
1:30pm - 2:50pm
PHIL 125 (section 1)
Kant's First Critique (PHIL 225)

(Graduate students register for 225.) The founding work of Kant's critical philosophy emphasizing his contributions to metaphysics and epistemology. His attempts to limit...

De Pierris, G. 2017-2018 Spring
Monday Wednesday
1:30pm - 2:50pm
420-245
PHIL 152 (section 1)
Computability and Logic (PHIL 252)

Approaches to effective computation: recursive functions, register machines, and Turing machines. Proof of their equivalence, discussion of Church's thesis. Elementary...

Sommer, R. 2017-2018 Spring
Monday Wednesday
8:30am - 10:20am
School of Education 334
PHIL 152 (section 1)
Computability and Logic (PHIL 252)

Approaches to effective computation: recursive functions, register machines, and Turing machines. Proof of their equivalence, discussion of Church's thesis. Elementary...

Sommer, R. 2017-2018 Spring
Monday Wednesday
8:30am - 10:20am
School of Education 334
PHIL 154 (section 1)
Modal Logic (PHIL 254)

(Graduate students register for 254.) Syntax and semantics of modal logic and its basic theory: including expressive power, axiomatic completeness, correspondence, and...

Cohen, M., van Benthem, J. 2017-2018 Spring
Monday Wednesday
1:30pm - 2:50pm
530-127
PHIL 156A (section 1)
Modal Logics - A Modern Perspective (PHIL 256A)

Modal logic encompasses a rich variety of systems that have been used within philosophy to study such diverse topics as necessity and possibility, knowledge, time, action...

ARECES, C. 2017-2018 Spring
Tuesday Thursday
10:30am - 11:50am
380-381T
PHIL 163 (section 1)
Significant Figures in Philosophy of Science: Einstein (PHIL 263)

(Graduate students register for 263.)nThe influences of Hertz, Boltzmann, Mach and Planck on the development of Einstein's philosophical views regarding the scope and...

Ryckman, T. 2017-2018 Spring
Monday Wednesday
3:00pm - 4:20pm
240-101
PHIL 169 (section 1)
Evolution of the Social Contract (PHIL 269)

Explore naturalizing the social contract. Classroom presentations and term papers.nTexts: Binmore - Natural Justicen Skyrms - Evolution of the Social Contract.

Skyrms, B. 2017-2018 Spring
Tuesday
3:00pm - 5:50pm
70-72A1
PHIL 170 (section 1)
Ethical Theory (ETHICSOC 170, PHIL 270)

How should we live our lives? Should you love your neighbour as yourself? Should you be digging wells rather than taking philosophy classes? Is taxation just? What...

Maguire, B., Hauthaler, N. 2017-2018 Spring
Tuesday Thursday
12:00pm - 1:20pm
540-108
PHIL 171P (section 1)
20th Century Political Theory: Liberalism and its Critics (POLISCI 130)

In this course, students will learn and engage with the debates that have animated political theory since the early 20th century. What is the proper relationship between...

Coyne, B., Grinberg, M. 2017-2018 Spring
Monday Wednesday
1:30pm - 2:50pm
McMurtry Building 102, Oshman
PHIL 172V (section 1)
Virtue Ethics (PHIL 272V)

In recent years virtue ethics has emerged as a challenger to Kantian and utilitarian moral theories. In this course, we shall examine some of the leading contemporary...

Bobonich, C. 2017-2018 Spring
Tuesday Thursday
10:30am - 11:50am
260-007
PHIL 174C (section 1)
On What Is Intolerable (PHIL 274C)

Moral and political philosophy often focuses on ideals we should aspire to and principles we should follow. Yet individuals and societies almost invariably fall short of...

Naaman, O. 2017-2018 Spring
Tuesday Thursday
9:00am - 10:20am
200-107
PHIL 174E (section 1)
Egalitarianism: A course on the history and theory of egalitarianism and anti-egalitarianism (ETHICSOC 70X, PHIL 274E, POLISCI 138E)

Egalitarianism is a conception of justice that takes the value of equality to be of primary political and moral importance. There are many different ways to be an...

Bidadanure, J. 2017-2018 Spring
Tuesday Thursday
3:00pm - 4:20pm
PHIL 175A (section 1)
Ethics and Politics of Public Service (CSRE 178, ETHICSOC 133, HUMBIO 178, PHIL 275A, POLISCI 133, PUBLPOL 103D, URBANST 122)

Ethical and political questions in public service work, including volunteering, service learning, humanitarian assistance, and public service professions such as medicine...

Coyne, B., Tulipana, P., Young, J. 2017-2018 Spring
Tuesday Thursday
12:00pm - 1:20pm
Ceras 300
PHIL 175B (section 1)
Philosophy of Public Policy (ETHICSOC 75X, PHIL 275B)

From healthcare to parliamentary reforms to educational policies, social and public policies are underpinned by normative justifications - that is by different conceptions...

2017-2018 Winter
PHIL 183 (section 1)
Self-knowledge and Metacognition (PHIL 283)

The course will be divided into two parts. In the first, we will survey the dominant models of how we come to know our own mental states. Among the issues we will explore...

Alshanetsky, E. 2017-2018 Spring
Monday Wednesday
3:00pm - 4:20pm
200-201
PHIL 186 (section 1)
Philosophy of Mind (PHIL 286)

(Graduate students register for 286.) This is an advanced introduction to core topics in the philosophy of mind. Prerequisite: PHIL 80

Cao, R., Chipman, J. 2017-2018 Spring
Tuesday Thursday
1:30pm - 2:50pm
320-106
PHIL 194H (section 1)
Capstone Seminar: Self-knowledge and Consciousness

Capstone seminar for the major. What is it for a mental state to be introspectively accessible, which mental states fall in this category, how does the capacity for...

Malmgren, A. 2017-2018 Spring
Friday
10:30am - 1:20pm
60-108
PHIL 198 (section 1)
The Dualist Undergraduate Journal

Weekly meeting of the editorial board of The Dualist, a national journal of undergraduate work in philosophy. Open to all undergraduates. May be repeated.

Turman, J. 2017-2018 Spring
Friday
11:30am - 12:20pm
90-92Q
PHIL 199 (section 1)
Seminar for Prospective Honors Students

Open to juniors intending to do honors in philosophy. Methods of research in philosophy. Topics and strategies for completing honors project. May be repeated for credit....

Yang, K. 2017-2018 Spring
Friday
12:30pm - 1:20pm
90-92Q
PHIL 213A (section 1)
Porphyry's Introduction to Logic (PHIL 113A)

The main text will be the Isagoge.

Code, A. 2017-2018 Spring
Monday
3:00pm - 5:50pm
PHIL 220 (section 1)
Leibniz (PHIL 120)

A polymath, Leibniz invented the calculus independently of Newton and made major contributions to virtually every science, including logic and computer science. In this...

Parker, A. 2017-2018 Spring
Monday Wednesday
1:30pm - 2:50pm
PHIL 225 (section 1)
Kant's First Critique (PHIL 125)

(Graduate students register for 225.) The founding work of Kant's critical philosophy emphasizing his contributions to metaphysics and epistemology. His attempts to limit...

De Pierris, G. 2017-2018 Spring
Monday Wednesday
1:30pm - 2:50pm
420-245
PHIL 229 (section 1)
Plotinus and Augustine (PHIL 329, RELIGST 269, RELIGST 369)

Professor's permission required to register. A reading course focused on the influence of Plotinus Enneads on Augustine's Confessions, early dialogues, and sections on...

Sheehan, T. 2017-2018 Spring
Tuesday Thursday
10:30am - 11:50am
120-414
PHIL 239 (section 1)
Teaching Methods in Philosophy

For Ph.D. students in their first or second year who are or are about to be teaching assistants for the department. May be repeated for credit.

Kim, H., Paterson, G.
Kim, H.
2017-2018 Spring
Friday
11:30am - 1:20pm
200-201
PHIL 241 (section 1)
Dissertation Development Seminar

Required of second-year Philosophy Ph.D. students; restricted to Stanford Philosophy Ph.D. students. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

Bobonich, C. 2017-2018 Summer
Wednesday
3:00pm - 5:50pm
80-113

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