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Current Courses

Course Number Instructor(s) Subfield Quarter Day, Time, Location

PHIL 2 (section 1): Introduction to Moral Philosophy (ETHICSOC 20)

What should I do with my life? What kind of person should I be? How should we treat others? What makes actions right or wrong? What is good and what is bad? What should we...

Maguire, B., Parmer, W., Dowling, G., Lang, J., Hughes, P., Jerke, D. 2019-2020 Spring
Monday Wednesday
3:00pm - 4:20pm
Hewlett Teaching Center 201

PHIL 13 (section 1): Humanities Core: Great Books, Big Ideas -- Europe, Modern (DLCL 13, FRENCH 13, HISTORY 239C, HUMCORE 13)

This three-quarter sequence asks big questions of major texts in the European and American tradition. What is a good life? How should society be organized? Who belongs?...

Edelstein, D., Baker, K. 2019-2020 Spring
Monday Wednesday
10:30am - 11:50am
School of Education 210

PHIL 36 (section 1): Dangerous Ideas (ARTHIST 36, COMPLIT 36A, EALC 36, ENGLISH 71, ETHICSOC 36X, FRENCH 36, HISTORY 3D, MUSIC 36H, POLISCI 70, RELIGST 36X, SLAVIC 36)

Ideas matter. Concepts such as revolution, tradition, and hell have inspired social movements, shaped political systems, and dramatically influenced the lives of...

Anderson, R. 2019-2020 Spring
Wednesday
6:30pm - 8:00pm
320-105

PHIL 61 (section 1): Philosophy and the Scientific Revolution (HPS 61)

Galileo's defense of the Copernican world-system that initiated the scientific revolution of the 17th century, led to conflict between science and religion, and influenced...

Friedman, M. 2019-2020 Spring
Tuesday Thursday
1:30pm - 2:50pm
School of Education 206

PHIL 74A (section 1): Ethics in a Human Life (ETHICSOC 174, HUMBIO 174A)

Ethical questions pervade a human life from before a person is conceived until after she dies, and at every point in between. This course raises a series of ethical...

Dannenberg, J., Woodworth, S., D'Angelo, L. 2019-2020 Spring
Monday Wednesday
1:30pm - 2:50pm
260-113

PHIL 80 (section 1): Mind, Matter, and Meaning

Intensive study of central topics in metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of language and mind in preparation for advanced courses in philosophy. Emphasis on development...

Kim, R., Lawrence, P., Warren, J., Luo, C., Pistol, L., Shiva, S. 2019-2020 Spring
Tuesday Thursday
3:00pm - 4:20pm
370-370

PHIL 102 (section 1): Modern Philosophy, Descartes to Kant

Major figures in early modern philosophy in epistemology, metaphysics, and philosophy of mind. Writings by Descartes, Leibniz, Hume, and Kant.

De Pierris, G., Taylor, G., Kim, H., Lee, R. 2019-2020 Spring
Tuesday Thursday
12:00pm - 1:20pm
200-203

PHIL 107B (section 1): Plato's Later Metaphysics and Epistemology (PHIL 207B)

A close reading of Plato's Theatetus and Parmenides, his two mature dialogues on the topics of knowledge and reality. We will consider various definitions of knowledge,...

Amaral, J., Code, A. 2019-2020 Spring
Monday
3:00pm - 5:50pm
100-101K

PHIL 108 (section 1): Aristotle's Metaphysics Book Alpha (PHIL 208)

An introduction both to Aristotle's own metaphysics and to his treatment of his predecessors on causality, included the early Ionian cosmologists, atomism, Pythagoreans,...

Code, A. 2019-2020 Spring
Monday
11:30am - 2:20pm
110-114

PHIL 117 (section 1): Descartes (PHIL 217)

(Formerly 121/221.) Descartes's philosophical writings on rules for the direction of the mind, method, innate ideas and ideas of the senses, mind, God, eternal truths, and...

De Pierris, G. 2019-2020 Spring
Tuesday Thursday
3:00pm - 4:20pm
200-205

PHIL 132 (section 1): Phenomenology: Merleau-Ponty (PHIL 232)

(Graduate students register for 232.) French philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty wrote that we are neither angels nor machines but living beings. In contrast to both a...

Jackson, G. 2019-2020 Winter
Tuesday Thursday
12:00pm - 1:20pm
80-115

PHIL 134 (section 1): Phenomenology: Husserl (PHIL 234)

(Graduate students register for 234.) Neuroscience, psychology, linguistics, artificial intelligence, and other related fields face fundamental obstacles when they turn to...

Jackson, G. 2019-2020 Spring
Tuesday Thursday
12:00pm - 1:20pm
380-381U

PHIL 135X (section 1): Citizenship (ETHICSOC 135, POLISCI 135)

This class begins from the core definition of citizenship as membership in a political community and explores the many debates about what that membership means. Who is (or...

Coyne, B., Panchakunathorn, P. 2019-2020 Spring
Tuesday Thursday
3:00pm - 4:20pm
Econ 139

PHIL 152 (section 1): Computability and Logic (PHIL 252)

Approaches to effective computation: recursive functions, register machines, and Turing machines. Proof of their equivalence, discussion of Church's thesis. Elementary...

Chipman, J., Sommer, R. 2019-2020 Spring
Monday Wednesday
10:30am - 12:20pm
Thornt110

PHIL 154 (section 1): Modal Logic (PHIL 254)

(Graduate students register for 254.) Syntax and semantics of modal logic and its basic theory: including expressive power, axiomatic completeness, correspondence, and...

Turman, J., van Benthem, J. 2019-2020 Spring
Monday Wednesday
10:30am - 11:50am

PHIL 168M (section 1): Biological Individuality (PHIL 268M)

Our intuitions about the nature of organisms and of individuals are challenged by numerous puzzle cases in recent biological science. The nature of individuals is of long-...

McConwell, A. 2019-2020 Spring
Wednesday
11:30am - 2:20pm
200-202

PHIL 170B (section 1): Metaphor (PHIL 270B)

In metaphor we think and talk about two things at once: two different subject matters are mingled to rich and unpredictable effect. A close critical study of the main...

Hills, D. 2019-2020 Spring
Tuesday Thursday
3:00pm - 4:20pm
160-314

PHIL 175 (section 1): Philosophy of Law (ETHICSOC 175B, PHIL 275)

This course will explore foundational issues about the nature of law and its relation to morality, and about legal responsibility and criminal punishment. Prerequisite:...

Sugarman, E., Slabon, T., Bratman, M. 2019-2020 Spring
Tuesday Thursday
1:30pm - 2:50pm
Sequoia Hall 200

PHIL 176P (section 1): Democratic Theory (ETHICSOC 234, POLISCI 234)

Most people agree that democracy is a good thing, but do we agree on what democracy is? This course will examine the concept of democracy in political philosophy. We...

Coyne, B. 2019-2020 Spring
Tuesday Thursday
12:00pm - 1:20pm
Littlefield 103

PHIL 178M (section 1): Introduction to Environmental Ethics (ETHICSOC 178M, ETHICSOC 278M, PHIL 278M, POLISCI 134L)

How should human beings relate to the natural world? Do we have moral obligations toward non-human animals and other parts of nature? And what do we owe to other human...

Adams, M. 2019-2020 Spring
Tuesday Thursday
3:00pm - 4:20pm
Lathrop 180

PHIL 181B (section 1): Topics in Philosophy of Language (PHIL 281B)

This course builds on the material of 181/281, focusing on debates and developments in the pragmatics of conversation, the semantics/pragmatics distinction, the...

Crimmins, M. 2019-2020 Spring
Tuesday Thursday
12:00pm - 1:20pm
200-202

PHIL 184 (section 1): Formal and Informal Epistemology (PHIL 284)

What makes a belief reasonable? Should we even have beliefs, or would it be better to replace them with some other attitude? What is good reasoning, and what is the...

Briggs, R., Wilcox, J., Malmgren, A. 2019-2020 Spring
Tuesday
12:00pm - 2:50pm
260-113

PHIL 186M (section 1): Ontology of the Mental (PHIL 286M)

Taylor, K. 2019-2020 Spring
Monday Wednesday
10:30am - 11:50am

PHIL 194Z (section 1): Capstone: Living a Meaningful Literary Life

What makes life meaningful? It's a question that pulls on many, if not most, people; and in this course, we will give it rigorous consideration, with a slight twist. Our...

Holliday, J. 2019-2020 Spring
Friday
11:30am - 2:20pm
160-319

PHIL 194F (section 1): Capstone seminar: Beauty and Other Forms of Value

The nature and importance of beauty and our susceptibility to beauty, our capacity to discern it and enjoy it and prize it, as discussed by philosophers, artists, and...

Hills, D. 2019-2020 Spring
Tuesday Thursday
10:30am - 11:50am
100-101K

PHIL 198 (section 1): The Dualist

The Dualist brings together people who are passionate about exploring deep philosophical and life questions. We hope to create an intellectual community that promotes...

Kim, H. 2019-2020 Spring
Friday
1:30pm - 3:20pm
110-101

PHIL 199 (section 1): Seminar for Prospective Honors Students

Open to juniors intending to do honors in philosophy. Methods of research in philosophy. Topics and strategies for completing honors project. May be repeated for credit....

Hauthaler, N. 2019-2020 Spring
Friday
12:30pm - 1:20pm
110-101

PHIL 207B (section 1): Plato's Later Metaphysics and Epistemology (PHIL 107B)

A close reading of Plato's Theatetus and Parmenides, his two mature dialogues on the topics of knowledge and reality. We will consider various definitions of knowledge,...

Amaral, J., Code, A. 2019-2020 Spring
Monday
3:00pm - 5:50pm
100-101K

PHIL 208 (section 1): Aristotle's Metaphysics Book Alpha (PHIL 108)

An introduction both to Aristotle's own metaphysics and to his treatment of his predecessors on causality, included the early Ionian cosmologists, atomism, Pythagoreans,...

Code, A. 2019-2020 Spring
Monday
11:30am - 2:20pm
110-114

PHIL 217 (section 1): Descartes (PHIL 117)

(Formerly 121/221.) Descartes's philosophical writings on rules for the direction of the mind, method, innate ideas and ideas of the senses, mind, God, eternal truths, and...

De Pierris, G. 2019-2020 Spring

PHIL 234 (section 1): Phenomenology: Husserl (PHIL 134)

(Graduate students register for 234.) Neuroscience, psychology, linguistics, artificial intelligence, and other related fields face fundamental obstacles when they turn to...

Jackson, G. 2019-2020 Spring
Tuesday Thursday
12:00pm - 1:20pm
380-381U

PHIL 239 (section 1): Teaching Methods in Philosophy

For Ph.D. students in their first or second year who are or are about to be teaching assistants for the department. May be repeated for credit.

Slabon, T. 2019-2020 Spring
Friday
11:30am - 1:20pm
160-332

PHIL 252 (section 1): Computability and Logic (PHIL 152)

Approaches to effective computation: recursive functions, register machines, and Turing machines. Proof of their equivalence, discussion of Church's thesis. Elementary...

Chipman, J., Sommer, R. 2019-2020 Spring
Monday Wednesday
10:30am - 12:20pm
Thornt110

PHIL 254 (section 1): Modal Logic (PHIL 154)

(Graduate students register for 254.) Syntax and semantics of modal logic and its basic theory: including expressive power, axiomatic completeness, correspondence, and...

Turman, J., van Benthem, J. 2019-2020 Spring
Monday Wednesday
10:30am - 11:50am

PHIL 268M (section 1): Biological Individuality (PHIL 168M)

Our intuitions about the nature of organisms and of individuals are challenged by numerous puzzle cases in recent biological science. The nature of individuals is of long-...

McConwell, A. 2019-2020 Spring
Wednesday
11:30am - 2:20pm
200-202

PHIL 270B (section 1): Metaphor (PHIL 170B)

In metaphor we think and talk about two things at once: two different subject matters are mingled to rich and unpredictable effect. A close critical study of the main...

Hills, D. 2019-2020 Spring
Tuesday Thursday
3:00pm - 4:20pm
160-318

PHIL 275 (section 1): Philosophy of Law (ETHICSOC 175B, PHIL 175)

This course will explore foundational issues about the nature of law and its relation to morality, and about legal responsibility and criminal punishment. Prerequisite:...

Sugarman, E., Slabon, T., Bratman, M. 2019-2020 Spring
Tuesday Thursday
1:30pm - 2:50pm
Sequoia Hall 200

PHIL 278C (section 1): Free Speech, Academic Freedom, and Democracy (EDUC 217, ETHICSOC 217X)

The course examines connected ideas of free speech, academic freedom, and democratic legitimacy that are still widely shared by many of us but have been subject to...

Callan, E. 2019-2020 Spring
Monday Wednesday
8:30am - 10:20am
300-303

PHIL 278M (section 1): Introduction to Environmental Ethics (ETHICSOC 178M, ETHICSOC 278M, PHIL 178M, POLISCI 134L)

How should human beings relate to the natural world? Do we have moral obligations toward non-human animals and other parts of nature? And what do we owe to other human...

Adams, M. 2019-2020 Spring
Tuesday Thursday
3:00pm - 4:20pm
Lathrop 180

PHIL 281B (section 1): Topics in Philosophy of Language (PHIL 181B)

This course builds on the material of 181/281, focusing on debates and developments in the pragmatics of conversation, the semantics/pragmatics distinction, the...

Crimmins, M. 2019-2020 Spring
Tuesday Thursday
12:00pm - 1:20pm
200-202

PHIL 284 (section 1): Formal and Informal Epistemology (PHIL 184)

What makes a belief reasonable? Should we even have beliefs, or would it be better to replace them with some other attitude? What is good reasoning, and what is the...

Briggs, R., Wilcox, J., Malmgren, A. 2019-2020 Spring
Tuesday
12:00pm - 2:50pm
260-113

PHIL 286M (section 1): Ontology of the Mental (PHIL 186M)

Taylor, K. 2019-2020 Spring
Monday Wednesday
10:30am - 11:50am

PHIL 302P (section 1): Plato's Laws X

Grad seminar. Close reading and analysis of Book 10 of Plato's Laws. In this book, Plato's political thought intersects with his philosophic theology (and therein also...

Pinto, R. 2019-2020 Spring
Wednesday
1:30pm - 4:20pm

PHIL 317 (section 1): Topics in Plato: Plato on Practical Rationality

Bobonich, C. 2019-2020 Spring
Tuesday
3:00pm - 5:50pm
90-92Q

PHIL 327 (section 1): Scientific Philosophy: From Kant to Kuhn and Beyond

Examines the development of scientific philosophy from Kant, through the Naturphilosophie of Schelling and Hegel, to the neo-Kantian scientific tradition initiated by...

Friedman, M. 2019-2020 Spring
Wednesday
2:30pm - 5:20pm
100-101K

PHIL 339 (section 1): Marx (POLISCI 333S)

This course examines the works of a thinker who radically transformed the ways that we think about modern society. Marx saw fundamental problems with capitalist societies...

Satz, D. 2019-2020 Spring
Wednesday
3:00pm - 5:50pm

PHIL 359 (section 1): Topics in Logic, Information and Agency

Logical analysis of information, interaction and games, with topics connecting philosophy, computer science, game theory, and other fields. The focus is on current...

van Benthem, J. 2019-2020 Spring
Tuesday
10:30am - 1:20pm

PHIL 371D (section 1): INEQUALITY: Economic and Philosophical Perspectives (ETHICSOC 371R, POLISCI 431L)

The nature of and problem of inequality is central to both economics and philosophy. Economists study the causes of inequality, design tools to measure it and track it...

Satz, D., McPherson, M. 2019-2020 Spring
Wednesday
3:30pm - 5:20pm
Encina Center 464

PHIL 384P (section 1): Mental Action and Its Pathologies

In this graduate seminar, we will examine the nature of mental action. What is mental action? What kinds of mental actions can we perform intentionally? Is there such a...

Peacocke, A. 2019-2020 Spring
Monday
1:30pm - 4:20pm
110-101

PHIL 384W (section 1): The Liar Paradox

This is a graduate seminar on the liar and related paradoxes. We will go over recent approaches, starting with Kripke's 1975 approach. Work on the liar by Field, McGee,...

Warren, J. 2019-2020 Spring
Wednesday
4:30pm - 7:20pm
160-120

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